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Dynamic Risk Assessment and Emergency Planning through Transportation of Dangerous Goods by Rail


Dynamic Risk Assessment and Emergency Planning through Transportation of Dangerous Goods by Rail

Transportation of hazardous materials, notably crude oil by rail are increasing in Canada and the USA. Due to the July 2013 Lac Megantic Train Derailment Disaster and increased concerns raised by municipalities across the country, Canadian Government issued a “protective direction” that requires railway companies to share dangerous goods data with municipalities and first responders. Ali Asgary, Associate Professor, Disaster & Emergency Management at York University in Toronto, Canada is an expert in disaster, emergency, and business continuity management. His extensive research and effective teaching are enhanced by his active contributions to the profession and by translating them into real world practices at different levels. Dr. Asgary selected AnyLogic due to it’s multimethod, agent based and GIS capabilities to analyze and address the situation.

Disaster Response Applications Using Agent-Based Modeling


Disaster Response Applications Using Agent-Based Modeling

Battelle is the world’s largest, non-profit, independent R&D organization, and is a worldwide leader in the development, commercialization, and transfer of technology. They manage or co-manage laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and an international nuclear laboratory in the United Kingdom. Battelle developed a disaster response solution for a federal government agency using AnyLogic, and in particular, agent-based modeling due to its multimethod capabilities. Joe Simkins, Economist at Battelle shared the solution with the AnyLogic community during the AnyLogic Conference 2013 in Washington D.C. Joe works in the fields of applied microeconomics, emergent simulation, and behavioral economics with experience in a wide variety of project applications ranging from health care to disaster response.

Predictive Analysis in a Risk-Free Environment


Predictive Analysis in a Risk-Free Environment

From warehousing decisions and transportation planning, to minimizing expenses and maximizing service level, optimizing a supply chain and logistics network is a complex and multi-faceted exercise. In addition to the day-to-day challenges, prepare your organization for the unexpected; a port shutdown, trade policy changes or natural disasters. These and other unexpected events can have a devastating impact on your organization. Mitigating the impact of external factors by ensuring alternative mission-critical capability will help prepare your business to overcome such adversity. Compared to traditional methods, utilizing simulation modeling for crisis management, business continuity, cyber attacks, disaster recovery, reorganization and other “what-if” scenarios is a low-cost, relatively quick, easy-to-run solution. Simulation modeling allows you to visualize these key factors and engage decision makers to ensure your plan is as effective as possible, and that you are prepared for whatever you encounter.

Agent-Based Model for the Secondary Threat Resulting from a Ballistic Impact Event


Agent-Based Model for the Secondary Threat Resulting from a Ballistic Impact Event

The process by which a high-velocity impact event leads to fire ignition onboard military vehicles is complex, influenced by the interaction of heated debris fragments and fuel spurting from ruptured tanks. Matthew J. Bova of the University of Cincinnati, Frank W. Ciarallo of Wright State University, and Raymond R. Hill of the Airforce Institute of Technology completed a proof-of-concept project involving the secondary threat resulting from a ballistic impact event using agent-based modeling in AnyLogic. Developing a complete characterization of the secondary threat resulting from a high-velocity projectile impact on the exterior of an aircraft body is of particular concern to the aircraft survivability community. Such ballistic impacts typically result in penetration of the body, generating clouds of debris fragments and releasing large quantities of thermal energy.

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